The Importance of design to value

Having a good product or service just isn’t enough.  If you want to be chosen before a competitor, or command a premium, the whole package has to be right.

I am lucky enough to have a 2014 Mac Pro.  Lovely piece of kit.  When I got it the only Thunderbolt display on the market was from Apple, I was not prepared to move to a resolution lower than that of my iMac and I balked at the crazy price (three grand) for a 4K Sharp display.  Apple Thunderbolt display it was, then.

Fortunately the LG 34UM95 34″ 21:9 Ultrawide monitor has arrived and it’s great.  It has the same vertical resolution as the Apple display (1,440 pixels) but it’s much wider (3,440 v 2,560).  It’s a lovely piece of kit, with good connectivity (it’s the only Thunderbolt display other than the Apple and has HDMI) and display quality that is the match of the Apple’s.  And that width means the display can be used as two split screens.

So the LG is a new model, 34% bigger real estate and better connectivity, yet it sells for about the same price as what is now quite an old Apple model.  There are a number of reasons Apple kit commands a premium, but I’d like to look at something simple; packaging.

Apple’s Jobs-inspired design focus is legendary and that even extends to packaging.  Take a look at these two photos:

Apple Thunderbolt display box
Apple Thunderbolt display box
LG 34UM95 monitor box
LG 34UM95 monitor box

A greater contrast in styles is difficult to imagine.  The Apple box is practical (see the neat carrying handle) but relies on nothing more than a picture of the monitor.

The LG box by contrast is brash and packed full of features but just lacks class.  It does give Advanced Viewing Pleasure, but I’m not sure I need it shouted at me from the packaging.

It would be crazy for LG to try to out-Apple Apple, but that difference in design is an important element in the brands’ identities and that translates into pounds and pence.